BTO migration blog

Spring and autumn are exciting times for anyone who watches birds. Here on this blog we will make predictions about when to expect migrant arrivals and departures, so that you know when and where to see these well-travelled birds.

Friday, 23 May 2014

Migration slowing down

This week has been a classic mid-may week. Passerine numbers have slowed right down – most are now here and many are already feeding the young of their first broods – however, waders have been more prominent with some top drawer scarcities joining the Dunlin, Sanderling, Turnstone, Bar-tailed Godwit and Whimbrel as they pass through the UK to arctic breeding grounds. From the east, came a Terek Sandpiper, found in Lincolnshire and a Broad-billed Sandpiper also in Lincolnshire. Two summer plumaged Spotted Sandpipers, a couple of Lesser Yellowlegs and Pectoral Sandpipers and a Buff-breasted Sandpiper came from the west, whilst the south produced a further influx of Black-winged Stilts and a single Kentish Plover, we can expect more of the same over the next couple of weeks.

Terek Sandpiper by Andy Mason

With over twenty birds being reported at sites from the south coast as far north as Yorkshire, Bee-eater has to be the bird of the week. Other southern overshoots included at least ten Black Kites, five Hoopoes, five Red-rumped Swallows and at least three Great Reed Warblers, whilst a Red-footed Falcon and a handful of Red-backed Shrikes and Bluethroats and, at least two White-winged Black Terns came from the south-east.
Bee-eater by Su Gough

The biggest rarity of the week came in the form of one of the world’s rarest birds, a Cahow, or Bermuda Petrel, seen from a survey vessel 170 nautical miles WNW of County Kerry, and with a world population of around 500 birds it somewhat overshadowed Britain’s eighteenth Calandra Lark, found on Fair Isle.

With low pressure wheeling over the country and drawing air in from a southerly direction we may well see an arrival of Quail and a few classic mid-May birds such as Red-backed Shrike, Marsh Warbler and Wryneck, and if we get any appreciable easterly airflow, maybe a rarity such as Oriental Pratincole or Marsh Sandpiper, and if you’re out and about birding over the Bank Holiday weekend, don’t forget to submit your complete lists to BirdTrack and make your observations count.

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